Working...

Grounding

Grounding
Grounding
In electronics, ground is the reference point in an electrical circuit from which voltages are measured, a common return path for electric current, or a direct physical connection to the Earth.

Grounding is employed in electrical systems for several reasons. Equipment is connected to ground to prevent user contact with dangerous voltage in case insulation fails. In combination with fuses and breakers, this is one of the most important components of electrical safety. Grounding also helps limit the buildup of static electricity, and to absorb unlimited amounts of current without changing a circuit’s potential.

Grounding is accomplished with a variety of hardware, from straps and clamps to studs and posts. Neutral bars are installed in panels are used to bond all devices in a cabinet or enclosure to the main entry point and dissipate stray voltage. Grounding plates functionally similarly to posts and studs in that they are buried below grade, while providing a larger surface area for current to dissipate into the ground.